Baby box vouchers are go


Posted on
26th Jun 2018
by Ellie Dawes


Our baby box vouchers (and hats) are now being handed out in Nairobi.

It was an extremely exciting week for our Nairobi office last week, as we completed our baseline survey and began registering mums to take part in our baby box programme!

The baseline survey has been an enomous undertaking for the team, they have interviewed hundreds of women about their experience of prengancy, birth and postnatal care. The data from this survey will be compared to one taken at the close of the programme, so we can see what difference it makes to these families. 

Doreen, our programme support assistant, has been sending me the stories of some of the women she's met, who are happy for Child.org to share them with you. During her research, she met Evelyn, Mercy and baby Brighton.

Evelyn, Mercy and Brighton

Evelyn's last pregnancy, six years ago, ended in tragedy. At eight months pregnant she had an accident at home and started bleeding. She was taken to hospital, where she says nurses were slow to respond but eventually said she was OK and left her to be looked after by medical students. However, when Evelyn came to give birth the doctors found she had lost too much blood, and water from her womb. Evelyn says that she had lost so much blood that the doctors could not locate her veins. She fell asleep in the hospital and later woke to be told that her baby had died. 

Later Evelyn had to return to hospital to treat blood clotting in her legs, she has wounds in her legs that are still not completely healed. This has forced her to quit her job, which has hit her family hard.

Seven months ago, Evelyn's teenage daughter Mercy gave birth to baby Brighton, making Evelyn a grandmother. Mercy found the pregnancy difficult and motherhood stressful, with no support from the baby's father. Money is extremely tight for this young family - but Evelyn knew how important it was to support Mercy fiercely and asked her to move back in with her for a while after Brighton was born. We asked Evelyn what advice she would pass on, as a mum and grandmother. She said "If you have a problem during pregnancy, see a doctor every time. When doctors were on strike, I had to see a Traditional Birth Attendant as I could not afford a private doctor. If you have a teenage daughter who is pregnant, stand by her, or else she will lose hope."

Mercy told us that she would love to see more support given to teenage mums like herself. She added, "I would like my child to get educated and to get a good job."

What's happening now?

Now the baseline research and training is complete, we have started registering pregnant women to receive baby boxes! The team will hand out 500 boxes in Nairobi. Mums are registered when they attend the Health Centre for an antenatal check-up, and given a voucher and a baby hat.

When the mum returns to the health centre after the baby is born, they will be able to collect their baby box. This is how we investigate whether the box works as an incentive for more women to attend their postnatal appointments, in an area where attendance of postnatal care is very low. 

Of course, we'll also be following up with a survey of these mums a few months later, to discover if the box and accompanying advice is proving useful for the new family. 

Below are some photographs from Cherio, our Programming Officer in Kenya, of the vouchers and baby hats being handed out last week. I love how the team have packaged the hats and voucher with ribbon - to make them feel like valuable gifts for the mums who receive them! In our Child.org team meeting yesterday morning, Cherio told us that 66 of 500 mums had already been registered - a really promising sign that women are keen to take part and believe the box will be useful for them. 

Research pays

I think it's important to understand that all this research around the programme is expensive. Each in-depth interview with a mum takes an hour of staff time. Child.org could choose to do less research, collect less data and give boxes to more mums, or fill each box with more gifts. 

The reason we don't do that is because we believe that discovering the impact of our Baby Box programme has the potential for a wider impact beyond a few hundred families. We want to arm ourselves, and others with the information we need to make informed descisions and make our work more effective in the long term. Thanks to you, we're discovering what works - and we are enormously grateful to all our donors who have the foresight to support this approach.

If you agree, please do consider donating regularly to help us do more great work like this. Our team know the names of every Core supporter and are so grateful to have you behind us.

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The baby boxes have arrived!


Posted on
31st May 2018
by Anne-Liese van der Linden


It's an exciting moment for our programming team - and for all of you who donated earlier in the year to make our Baby Box programme happen.

We have been working hard on the development and design of the Baby Box. And we are proud to show you the first result! The box can be folded into a flat pack which will make it easy for mums to carry it from the hospital. 

The products that will go into the box (the mattress, mosquito net, sheets and blanket) are still being manufactured. But we are very happy with the result of the cardboard box! The box is manufactured by a factory in Nairobi. This is because we want to help mothers in Nairobi but we also want to be mindful of the local economy by not importing products but working with local manufacturers instead. This does bring some extra challenges, but we are very happy with the result!

Featuring illustrations by Jaqueline Fryers, the lid of the box has advice on safe sleeping in both English and Swahili, and some warning signs to look out for in newborn babies, encouraging parents to take their baby to a health centre if they suspect something is wrong. 

Our next steps will be to distribute the boxes to the health facilities we will be working with. They will be able to hand out the boxes to new mums who have registered and who hand in their baby box voucher during their and their baby’s postnatal check-up at the health centre. (There is some more info in our previous blog here about how this will work).

In the meantime the Kenyan team are hard at work training new researchers to conduct the baseline survey. Here's a photograph from a training session this week:

This survey is going to give us more information about the situation of the mothers and their babies in Nairobi, with a focus on their experiences in the maternal healthcare system. More on all this soon!

For more information on the Baby Boxes project take a look at child.org/babyboxes

What is it?

Gyms in the UK are all about promoting good health and fitness. Spend an afternoon putting your gym's exercise bikes through their paces - and raise money for Child.org's mission to provide comprehensive school health in Kenyan schools. 

A Child.org Attack the Bike session takes place in a local gym, where participants get some tunes pumping, saddle up and attempt to ride as far as they can.

Find an Attack the Bike session near you, below, or contact your local gym to organise your own!

How does it work?

1. Contact your local gym to ask if you can use their bikes for a day and get a group of friends together. The more the merrier!

2. Create your online fundraising page and ask your friends to donate to support Child.org's global health projects

3. Spend an afternoon sweating and laughing as you tackle your chosen distance alongside your mates. 

Attack the Bike is simpler to organise than a regular bike ride, and there's no need to worry about the weather! Best of all, riders of all abilities can set their own target distance and ride at their own speed - but they'll still be riding right alongside each other. Because there's no I in team, guys.

Why?

A comprehensive school health programme means the world for a little girl like Zulea.

Child.org know that children can't get a proper education if they're held back by health issues. We also know that just tackling one health issue in a child's school doesn't have a significant impact. So we've created a comprehensive school health programme that works with schools and local government. 

Since Child.org started working in Zulea's school, she and her friends have access to clean water, toilets, handwashing stations with soap, a school first aid kit, a health club, deworming tablets and malaria nets. They're now being taught a whole range of health skills, from family planning and healthy relationship behaviours to good nutrition and disease prevention. 

Resources

Attack the Bike Playlist

We're putting together a playlist to keep you peddaling! Check it out out Spotify, and tweet us @childdotorg with your comments and suggestions.

Listen to the playlist

 

Paper sponsorship form

If you wanna go old school and collect offline donations, then please use this paper form! Send it to the Child.org office (Child.org, studio 54, Hackney Downs Studios  Amhurst Terrace, E8 2BT) with a note of explanation and a cheque and we'll process it so that we can reclaim GiftAid on donations.

(Full disclosure: processing offline donations takes up more of our small team's time - so it's cheaper for us if you use an online fundraising page.  But we understand that some people still like paper, so you're very welcome to use this method if it works for you!)

Print the form

 

Child.org Merch

Get your hands on our high quality and beautiful Child.org merch by hitting your fundraising target! When you've raised over £100 on your page, ask your contact at Child.org to send you a lovely tote bag. Hit £200 and we'll send you one of our designer Child.org t-shirts in black or white.

Get fundraising

Our Bike Attacking Heroes

Ask Francine

Want to organise your own Attack the Bike? Get in touch with Francine.

07751 768207

Get outside!

For Child.org, providing families with access to clean water is central to so much of the work we do.

In many of the Kenyan schools we work with, there was originally no clean drinking water or sanitation provision. Children were walking long distances home at lunchtime just to use the toilet, and not returning for their afternoon lessons.

By providing clean drinking water and sanitation in our HealthStart schools, we make sure that children are free to learn.

By providing water tanks in rural areas, we make sure that women can grow crops to feed their families. 

No one should have to spend most of their day walking to access clean water.

If you have clean water coming out of your tap at home, then take on a Child.org Walk with Water! You'll raise vital funds to pay for Child.org's work, and gain new appreciation of what life is like in places where the water doesn't come to you - you have to go and get it.

What's a Walk with Water?

A challenging but picturesque walk through your local city or countryside - where you carry a load of water with you.

Choose the length of your walk and the amount of water you carry based on your own fitness and abilities. (Most of our Water Walk organisers will recommend a distance and an amount to carry.)

To take part:

1. Choose a Walk with Water event from the list below

2. Create a fundraising page to join their team

3. Get in touch with the walk organiser and they'll send you all the details! 

Why?

For Rebecca, securing a water tank for her village meant even more than clean water and being able to provide food.

Rebecca is a grandmother but she walks 10km every Monday to attend an agricultural training and support group, run by CIFORD - Child.or'g partners in Meru, Kenya. When she started attending the group, Rebecca was laughed at by neighbours in her village. "Can't you get the group to come and meet here?" They would taunt. 

But when the group membership meant that Rebecca secured a brand new water tank for her area, her neighbours had a whole different attitude. Rebecca became the hero of her village, and everybody wanted to know where she had managed to get the tank from. Now, Rebecca is a respected ambassador for her local area, and brings the village's concerns to the meetings. She has provided a catalyst for getting more and more people involved with the local community group, empowering women in her local society.

Rebecca says "I have been having problems with my legs, so it had become hard to go looking for water. I had to wait for my grandchildren to come from school to fetch water. Now the problem is solved. All the people in my village can also see I have a group which can support the elder women in our society."

 

Upcoming Walk with Water events

Watch this space - new Walk with Water events will be listed here soon!

Resources

Plan a walk route

If you'd like to plan a Child.org Walk with Water, this website is a great place to find suggested routes near you.

Find local walking routes

 

Paper sponsorship form

If you wanna go old school and collect offline donations, then please use this paper form! Send it to the Child.org office (Child.org, studio 54, Hackney Downs Studios  Amhurst Terrace, E8 2BT) with a note of explanation and a cheque and we'll process it so that we can reclaim GiftAid on donations.

(Full disclosure: processing offline donations takes up more of our small team's time - so it's cheaper for us if you use an online fundraising page.  But we understand that some people still like paper, so you're very welcome to use this method if it works for you!)

Print the form

 

Child.org Merch

Get your hands on our high quality and beautiful Child.org merch by hitting your fundraising target! When you've raised over £100 on your page, ask your contact at Child.org to send you a lovely tote bag. Hit £200 and we'll send you one of our designer Child.org t-shirts in black or white.

Get fundraising

Our Water Walking Heroes

Ask Francine

Want to organise your own Walk with Water? Get in touch with Francine.

07751 768207

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