The Shindig: Your most loved ideas from Child.org


Posted on
04th Feb 2020
by Ellie Dawes


You loved this so much...

At The Shindig last week, we invited our supporters into our Bright Ideas Lab - where the walls were covered with 60 discoveries, opportunities, solutions and projects - all generated by Child.org in 2019.

Guests were given three different kinds of sticker to stick on the Bright Ideas they were more intrigued by: I Love This So Much, Tell Me More Tell Me More, and We Have to Change This. I promised to update you all with more information about the ideas that attracted the most interest on the night.

I Love This So Much Top Five

Here are the posters that prompted the most people to use their sticker to say "I love this so much".

1. Designing a new way to reach mums with safe sleeping information

The Child.org Baby Box programme can feel like it’s all about giving nice boxes to families. In fact, at its core, our Baby Box programme is about arming mums with the health information they need to keep their baby safe. Knowledge about safe sleeping is a key indicator. The change in the level of understanding between the baseline (pre-programme) survey - when just 7% of mums knew a baby was safest sleeping on thier back - and afterwards (43%), showed that the information was reaching mums who participated. 

The Baby Boxes used in our pilot in Nairobi were printed with safe sleeping information on the lid, and this information was also communicated at the postnatal care session that each mum had to attend in order to receive her box. 

If you love arming mums with information, join Team Mum Monthly to fund more of Child.org’s work with mums and newborns. You can read the Baby Box Pilot report in full here

2. Ohh, what's occurrin'? A Gavin and Stacey Spectacular Pub Quiz

Our guests at The Shindig were particularly excited to learn that the Retold Productions team have added Gavin and Stacey to their regular schedule of Spectacular Pub Quizzes. 

Tickets for the quiz are on sale here.

Spectacular Pub Quizzes made around £8000 profit in 2019, providing a valuable stream of unrestricted funding for Child.org. Ohh what’s Occurrin’? was launched just half way through the year and is already proving a very popular theme - raising around £1000 of that profit. It is currently trending as one of the Top Five Events on Design My Night!

3. Remarkable Tours goes international

Shindig guests were also very excited about us launching our popular Remarkable Tours in other countries. This is all down to a hugely successful partnership with our friends at Airbnb. 

As Amy announced on stage at The Shindig, over 6000 people came on Remarkable Tours in 2019, raising around £70,000 in profit for Child.org. The team are now planning tour launches in Dublin and Amsterdam, and are working with Tyson in our Nairobi office to create Kenyan tours too. 

In 2019, we won the Airbnb social impact award for our Remarkable Tours, which are all delivered exclusively through their platform. You can check out the current list of Remarkable Tours here - do get in touch with Beth (beth@child.org) if you’d like to discuss booking a bespoke tour or experience!

4. Pregnant Women's Groups launch in Meru

There was so much love in the room for our Pregnant Women’s Groups, launching in Meru THIS WEEK. Last week, The Child.org Kenya team were in Meru to run training with the Social Mobilisers who run the groups:

Each social mobiliser received a pack to help them run the groups, including referral forms, a Session Guide (which works as a visual aid) and a Social Mobiliser Guide which explains how to perform the role and contains a wealth of information about safe pregnancy and early motherhood. They also each received a crocheted boob, created by Namsi

These groups are funded by your Team Mum fundraising in 2019 - and matched funding from the UK government through Uk Aid Match. 

Our programming team are also hard at work creating the next iteration of our Pregnant Women’s Groups. This new version is designed to run in Siaya county, an area of Kenya where new mums are facing different challenges. We’re hoping to fund this programme in 2020 with a brand new Team Mum Campaign, launching in September. If you want to help, sign up for the November Ride Africa, plan to Sell One Thing from your home and donate the proceeds during the Team Mum appeal, or email me ellie@child.org to ask about how to support!

5. Working with Ruby Cup to provide menstrual cups and health education to school girls in Narok


Child.org formed a partnership with Ruby Cup in 2019, providing sustainable menstrual health solutions to women and girls. Ride Africa riders on our All-Women Team Mum ride were there to help with this first distribution!

The team in Kenya have created a design for a new iteration of our HealthStart programme, to operate in Narok, Kenya. This version of our school health programme has Ruby Cup distribution built into the design, alongside a programme of education. If we can secure funding to launch this programme, we hope to change the impact of periods on girls’ education in these schools (supporting more amazing young advocates like Zulea!)

More Bright Ideas...

Those are the top five ideas that our supporters at The Shindig considered most worthy of their "Love This..." stickers. Want to see what they chose to stick these stickers on?

 

 

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About your data: When you fill in this form, you're requesting emails inviting you to The Shindig. We only send you an email when we have something to tell you about The Shindig (the event happens once a year) unless you've signed up to the Child.org newsletter. When you sign up for Child.org's newsletter, you're registering to receive emails from us about what we're up to. These emails will include news about the awesome work we're doing, and interesting ways for you to get involved. We only send you an email when we have something interesting to say, no boring spam. (You'll usually hear from us every couple of months.) To send you emails, we have to store your data. Child.org will never pass on or sell your data to other companies, or send you marketing, without your permission. If you're interested in how and why we store your data, you can read our Privacy Notice here.

The Shindig: The Child.org bright ideas that inspired you to change things


Posted on
04th Feb 2020
by Ellie Dawes


What inspires you to drive change?

At The Shindig last week, we invited our supporters into our Bright Ideas Lab - where the walls were covered with 60 discoveries, opportunities, solutions and projects - all generated by Child.org in 2019.

Guests were given three different kinds of sticker to stick on the Bright Ideas they were more intrigued by: I Love This So Much, Tell Me More Tell Me More, and We Have to Change This. I promised to update you all with more information about the ideas that attracted the most interest on the night.

Your Top Five Changes to Make in the World

Here are the Child.org discoveries that prompted the most people to use their sticker to say "We Have to Change This".

1. Low antenatal care attendace in rural Kenya

Child.org have been talking about encouraging Kenyan mums to access antenatal care for a couple of years now, ever since we asked you to donate at Christmas 2017 to fund our first Baby Box programme pilot. In Meru, sessions can be a long journey away and not everyone is aware of how important these sessions are to monitor the health of mum and baby. 

One of the sessions in our Pregnant Women’s groups focuses specifically on antenatal care - here’s a section of our Team Mum Meru social mobiliser guide which shows you the kind of information that our Social Mobilisers in Meru will be able to share with the mums in their groups starting this week:

 

 

If you want to reach more mums with information like this, join Team Mum Monthly today, or sign up for our newsletter and look out for emails about Team Mum 2020.

2. Young marriage in Sierra Leone

The difference in attitudes towards early marriage and motherhood was one of the things that surprised our Kenyan team when we conducted our research in Sierra Leone.

In Kenya, there’s a problem of very young mums like Winfred becoming isolated from their communities and families - which means they may not receive the support they need to help keep their baby safe. In Sierra Leone, young motherhood is actively encouraged, which means young girls having babies dangerously young, and missing out on the opportunities boys have to an education and a voice in their community. 

You can read more about what we found out in Sierra Leone in our latest report here

3. Safe sleeping misinformation

Tackling local misinformation about pregnancy and baby-care is a vital element of all our Team Mum programming.

At training this week, one of our Social Mobilisers was talking about a belief in her community that vaginal bleeding during pregnancy is just a sign that the baby needs to stay in the womb a bit longer. In fact, heavy vaginal bleeding during pregnancy can be a sign of serious problems - and should always be checked out by a doctor!

The team in Meru is excited about the opportunity to arm the mums in their community with up to date information.

 

4. Low provision of safe co-sleeping information.

Cosleeping is encouraged in Kenya to promote breastfeeding - but there are important things mums need to know about the practice. These include the risks of baby sharing the bed with multiple family members, or with adults who have been consuming alcohol. Safe co-sleeping wasn’t a focus for our first Baby Box pilot in Nairobi, but after what we learned during the pilot from talking to mums, we’re thinking a lot about how to improve access to the information in the new versions of the programme we’ve been designing recently. 

During our Baby Box pilot, we found that while 95% of mums used the box as a safe place to sleep - but only 2% of mums used the box to put baby to sleep at night. Mums told us that the box was most useful as a safe place for baby during the day, so they could have them nearby while they worked. 

It’s important to mention that the main function of the box, from a programming aims point of view, is as a method of spreading important health information. During our baby box pilot, attendance of postnatal care by mums increased by 81%. This meant that mums were gaining access to vital health checks and a awful lot of health information that they wouldn’t have otherwise have had access to. Survey results like these also help highlight gaps in the topics being covered in postnatal care sessions - and Child.org are often able to highlight and tackle these by delivering extra training to local healthcare professionals. 

(I’ve talked a bit more about safe sleeping in the Love This So Much list.)

5. Gender-specific baby gifts

Guests at The Shindig were surprised - as we were - to find out about how gendered the UK baby gift market is, particularly for corporate gifts. 

When we designed our Happy Parenting Treats, we felt there was an opportunity to provide modern, progressive companies with a gift option that would be suitable for any baby, and for parents of any gender. Check out these beautiful gift boxes here

More Bright Ideas...

Those are the top five ideas that our supporters at The Shindig considered most worthy of their "Tell me more..." stickers. If you would like any further information about any of these bright ideas - do get in touch!

Want to see what they chose to stick these stickers on?       

 

 

The Shindig: The Child.org bright ideas you wanted to hear more about


Posted on
04th Feb 2020
by Ellie Dawes


Here to tell you more, tell you more...

At The Shindig last week, we invited our supporters into our Bright Ideas Lab - where the walls were covered with 60 discoveries, opportunities, solutions and projects - all generated by Child.org in 2019.

Guests were given three different kinds of sticker to stick on the Bright Ideas they were more intrigued by: I Love This So Much, Tell Me More Tell Me More, and We Have to Change This. I promised to update you all with more information about the ideas that attracted the most interest on the night.

Your Moreish Top Five

Here are the posters that prompted the most people to use their sticker to say "Tell Me More, Tell Me More".

1. Visiting a new Baby Box Project with Ride Africa: Kenya 2020

Supporters were excited to hear about the return of Child.org’s Baby Box programme - particularly as there will be the opportunity to visit one of the new projects on the Ride Africa ride in November

The design of the next iteration of the project will have some interesting changes. For example, through the pilot we discovered that co-sleeping in Kenya is actively encouraged to promote breastfeeding (which meant that most mums used our boxes as a safe place for babies to sleep during the day). However, information about safer co-sleeping isn’t reaching mums. The team have been looking into safe co-sleeping devices,  (like these pepi-pods) which will enable babies at risk to sleep in bed with mum in a safe way that doesn’t impact breastfeeding. So there’s a chance our 2020 boxes might look different to those we created for the pilot programme!

Clare and her team of brilliant grant assistants have put a huge amount of effort in recent months into applying for grants to bring back Baby Boxes, and we’re very excited to have raised enough funding to launch the programme in 2020, thanks to their hard work (big thanks to Will, Isobelle and Aakash!)

2. Live podcast recordings at Vault Festival

The Child.org stage at Vault Festival launched last week, and you should definitely check out our programme of events! Look out on the festival website for events taking place at The Gift Horse Stage. 

You can book for the live podcast recordings mentioned on this poster here:

3. The mighty Charity Concierge

Charity Concierge is now open for applications in 2020! If you’d like to join us at any of these fab festivals, you can find all the info at charityconcierge.org

Charity Concierges work in teams with their friends, enjoy plenty of time off to enjoy the festival, and do fun, practical work that has a tangible impact. We’re very grateful to every volunteer who made 2019 a fab festival year for us - and to our friends at Festival Republic for their continued support. 

4. If you refer a friend to join Cahoots… we will give you £200.

If you know a social good organisation looking for a place to work near Old Street, Flora would love to hear from you. If they rent a desk with us, we will pay you a £200 referrer’s fee! 

Cahoots is our lovely collaborative workspace. As well as full membership, we also offer a free community membership of Cahoots, which enables you to come and work with us one day a month (with use of our meeting room and breakout spaces) absolutely free! Find out more, and arrange to come and take a look at the space: beincahoots.org

5. Our new Ride Africa: Kenya route - to the coast!

There was so much excitement about this new route at The Shindig. Hero rider Sharon told me that it’s the Kenyan route she’s always been told we should be riding, and Micky says he can’t wait to reach the coast and run into the sea!

At The Shindig, we were showing off some of the amazing photos that Tyson took on the recce. You can find out more about Ride Africa: Kenya 2020, and book your place, here

 

More Bright Ideas...

Those are the top five ideas that our supporters at The Shindig considered most worthy of their "Tell me more..." stickers. If you would like any further information about any of these bright ideas - do get in touch!

Want to see what they chose to stick these stickers on?       

 

 

Register for The Shindig 2020

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About your data: We'll only use this data to register you for The Shindig 2020. If you sign up for Child.org's newsletter, you're registering to receive emails from us about what we're up to. These emails will include news about the awesome work we're doing, and interesting ways for you to get involved. We only send you an email when we have something interesting to say, no boring spam. (You'll usually hear from us every couple of months.) To send you emails, and register you for the event we have to store your data. Child.org will never pass on or sell your data to other companies, or send you marketing, without your permission. If you're interested in how and why we store your data, you can read our Privacy Notice here.

Ride Africa: your impact in 2019


Posted on
03rd Jan 2020
by Ellie Dawes


If you took part in Ride Africa in 2018, here's some of the awesome things you've made happen at Child.org in 2019.

Ride Africa is Child.org's biggest source of unrestricted income. If you fundraise for your Ride Africa ride, or donate to support a rider, we owe our existence to you. Here's just a small insight into the work that that we could pay for in 2019 because of your support...

Pregnant women's groups in Meru, Kenya

In February 2019, Child.org launched our first ever Team Mum appeal, raising over £500,000 in three months - including matched funding from the UK government. Ride Africa fundraising paid for the cost of applying for this grant and running the appeal, and 2019 rider fundraising represented a quarter of the total raised during the appeal. This means that in 2020, thousands of new mums will have access to vital health information that they wouldn't have had before, because of our riders.

Donata (below) is one of the mums who shared her story during the appeal (watch her video here). In our most recent survey in Meru, we found that 66% of pregnant women couldn't name a single benefit of breastfeeding their baby. These pregnancy support groups are designed to arm mums with information like this, which could save the life of their child. 

Read an update & meet the team

Ride Africa funds our Kenyan team

Child.org's Nairobi office is largely funded by Ride Africa fundraising. Having our own team in Kenya means we can work with partners directly, create relationships with the ministry of health and local government organisations, and run some projects directly, like our Baby Box programme

A Child.org Kenya team member who our riders will know well is Tyson. Tyson's been involved with Child.org since he was a child himself, living in Kisumu (read his story here.) In 2019, we were extremely proud when Tyson was given the opportunity through his university to travel internationally for the first time in his life, representing Kenya in an international effort to promote the sustainable development goals. 

Read Tyson's latest blog

New enterprises: The launch of our Horrible Histories walking tour. 

In 2019, Child.org created the first ever Horrible Histories walking tour. Because of your fundraising, our London team were able to: hire a writer to adapt the Loathsome London book into an awesome interactive tour (thank you Liam Fleming); have meetings with Scholastic and Terry Deary to shape and approve the project; and get this event on sale through Airbnb.

After the launch, we worked with Airbnb to run a schools pilot. Airbnb paid us a grant to allow school groups to go on the tour for free. We even took Kids on the Green on the tour (a community group set up in the aftermath of the Grenfell tragedy for local kids affected). Launching new tours like this makes our charity more secure and sustainable, providing us with the income we need to commit to projects long term. 

Read more about our Remarkable Tours

The return of baby boxes in 2020

Some of the money raised by Ride Africa riders in 2018 and 2019 has been funding the development of the next iteration of Child.org's Baby Box programme. After a successful pilot in 2018, our team have been designing the next stage of the programme, researching the best location (where there is the greatest need) and applying for further funding to launch the new phase. The new project will launch in 2020, and in November, Ride Africa riders will visit the project to see for themselves how providing babies with a safe place to sleep can also help spread vital health information among communities. This is a lovely oppotunity for returning riders to see the impact of the donations they've raised in the past, and report back to the people who supported them last time!

Faith (below) is a fruit vendor in Nairobi who received a box for baby Tallia, who told us that the box provided an extremely useful place for her to put Tallia during the day, where she could cover her with a mosquito net and keep an eye on her! The Baby Box project pilot saw an 81% increase in women and babies accessing life changing services.

 

Some other highlights of 2019 include...

We started working with Ruby Cup, supplying women and girls with sustainable and hygenic menstuation products. 

We made new discoveries in Sierra Leone, conducting an assessment of health needs in the Yoni community.

We formed new links with the Kenyan Ministry of Health - expanding still further the potential for Child.org projects to have long-term influence and impact in the communities we're working with.

This all sounds great... but how far did my £20 go?

I know donors love to hear examples from our work of what their donation could have paid for specifically. Here are some examples of costs from some of the projects above, I hope they help to showcase just what great value our work is when you consider what an impact you can have with every pound you raise.

A donation of just £7 could pay for a crocheted boob, created by Kenyan crafter Namsi to be used by social mobilisers to demonstrate breastfeeding techniques. (Read more about these boobs here.)

A donation of £10 is enough to pay for a new mum starter pack in Meru. This pack contains some essentials that are spcific to the needs of mums in this community - like a weighing bag (which Mercy is looking at in the photo) which will guarantee that the womean's baby can be weighed at her local health facility. The pack also works as an incentive for pregnant women to attend all their support groups.

It costs £24 to print a copy of our big A3 Pregnant Women's Group Session Guides. These teaching guides help social mobilisers to run their groups and show information - a bit like a Powerpoint presentation which doesn't require electricity or equipment!

It costs just £74.07 for a young woman like Mercy to go through our entire Pregnant Women's Group programme. She'll attend six informative sessions, make a birth plan and be introduced to her local health facility where she can give birth in a safe environment.

 

What will Ride Africa pay for in 2020?

This year, Ride Africa fundraising will fund a new Team Mum project in Kenya, working with some of the very youngest and most vulnerable mums. We want to reach 2,240 adolescent mums in Siaya County through support groups. 

In this area of Kenya it is common for teenage girls to exchange sex for sanitary products, so they can attend school when they are on their period. Sadly, many fall pregnant and/or contract HIV, which is prevelant in this area. Many teenage mums then drop out of education altogether. 

The groups we will create with 2020 rider fundraising will teach similar important health information to those in Meru (including family planning, breastfeeding, what to expect from pregnancy, preparing for birth, and how to look after a newborn baby). These new groups will also have a focus on meeting the special needs of these very young expectant mums. Those who are HIV positive will be in groups together, to provide them with a safe space to speak openly - free from stigma and with a specially trained group leader. These mums will be encouraged to attend antenatal care services to receive treatment to prevent them from passing on the infection to thier baby.

All the groups in Siyaya will aim to improve pathways back into education for adolescent mums, offering advice, support and a "back to school" pack. 26% of girls in Siyaya aged 15-19 years of age have given birth to a live baby. If we can improve access to education in this group it could make a real difference to the gender education gap here. This brand new programme is an opportunity to investigate if Child.org's Pregnant Women's Group model can support the specific needs of these mums - who are themselves children living in difficult circumstances. 

Join Ride Africa 2020

If you're interested in supporting these really young mums in 2020 - then why not get on your bike? Our spectacular new route will showcase the most Kenyan wildlife ever seen on a Ride Africa ride - as we head through three national parks and visit elephant and rhino sanctuaries. On day four you'll reach the South Coast, where all your hard work pedalling will be rewarded with dazzling white beaches and a run into the warm sea. Then you'll head along the coast to bustling Mombasa and finish the ride for a trip to visit our brand new Baby Box project. 

What are you waiting for?

Sign up for Ride Africa 2020

Happy new year

The photo at the top of this blog shows mum Yvonne, baby Natalya and Shantel (5). Yvonne received a Child.org baby box when Natalya was born, she found the box and the mosquito net really useful. Shantel was very keen to pose for the camera when we visited the family, and she was sure to tell us which photos we should keep and which to delete. So I thought she'd like the idea of being on our homepage for the new year.

Happy New Year, Child.org fans. Be like Shantel - sashay into 2020 like you own it. 

 

 

If you like the way Child.org do things - then please support us. We are small and brave and we need your support to grow our impact. Join Team Mum monthly and help us build a stable future for Child.org by providing reliable funding for our work with mums and babies. Join today and we'll send you a free t-shirt!

Join Team Mum Monthly

Team Mum assembles in Meru


Posted on
15th Nov 2019
by Ellie Dawes


The team is coming together in Meru this week as the baseline survey and team training kicks off for our pregnant women's groups.

In Meru, we've hired the teams who will be running pregnancy support groups, and we're training social mobilisers to run the sessions. Meet some of the team involved, working for Child.org, local government and for CIFORD, our community partner in Meru:

Learning resources

The team have been very busy planning the session content and creating learning resources to be used at the groups.

These guides have been specially designed for the mums of Meru. Here are a few pages from our session guide, an A3 flip book that the session leaders prop up at the front of the class to show their group and aid discussions, with beautiful illustrations by Team Mum illustrator Emma Mary Douglas:

Our baseline survey

The first thing happening in Meru is an extensive baseline survey. This piece of research will collect information that will help us track the impact the programme is having - for example, we'll find out the level of local knowledge about subjects like breastfeeding and up to date figures on how many women give birth in a safe environment and access services like postnatal care. We'll then repeat this exercise after the programme has been running, so we know for sure what works and how we might improve the programme next time.  

The survey has been running for just a couple of days, but already we have collected 170 survey responses. We'll be publishing a full report into the survey results in January, but here are some things the team have noticed so far:

High rates of teenage pregancy: 49% of respondents had their first pregnancy between the ages of 15-19 with a further 6% being aged between 10-14 years. 55% of women we’ve spoken to so far were teens when they had their first pregnancy.

Mums face long journeys to safe delivery facilities: 37% of women have told us that to walk to their nearest facility offering delivery services would take two hours or more. (That's a long way to travel when you're in labour!)

Patriarchal control: 86% of mums we spoke to agreed that a husband should tell a woman how to take care of their child.

...and problems with quality of care when they arrive: 24% of mums weren’t given postnatal care checks before leaving health facilities after delivering. 11% of women were abused (verbally/slapped/punched) by a health worker during their delivery. 

A need for information: 53% of mums asked so far don’t know any benefits to breastfeeding. Another key target for the groups is to teach expectant women 7 key danger signs in pregnancy (below).  Out of the women we've spoken to so far, only 4.5% have been able to tell us 5 or more danger signs in pregnancy. 36% weren't able to name any at all. This means we can make an huge impact on the knowledge of pregnant women around when they need to seek care from a trained health worker. Our target is that after attending the support groups, women will be able to name at least five out of these seven!

 

 

Understanding more about the exact problems faced by mums in Meru before we start running pregnant women's groups helps us to design the programme to overcome those problems. (For example, when we found issues with postnatal care provision when he were running our Baby Box programme in Nairobi, the team worked with the local ministry for health to deliver a training day.)

We look forward to updating you further as the programme moves forward! For more regular updates, follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/childdotorg.

 

Our pregnancy support groups in Meru are funded by your donations during our Team Mum appeal in 2019, and with matched funding by the UK government.

 

We want to create even more pregnancy support groups in 2020. If you think Team Mum is awesome, join Team Mum monthly and help us fund more work like this. 

Alternative Christmas Jumper Day office fundraisers


Posted on
13th Nov 2019
by Ellie Dawes


This week, one of our partners asked us if we had any ideas for an alternative to Christmas Jumper Day in the office. Here are our ideas...

Christmas Jumper Day is a wonderful fundraiser that raises thousands for charities like Save the Children each year. But some people we've spoken to say they'd prefer a low-effort festive fundraiser that's a bit more sustainable.

We're mindful of the environmental impact of fast fashion too,  so we've had a bit of a brainstorm, and here are our ideas...

  1. Ornament competition. Donate to enter the competition for the best Christmas tree ornament, brought in from home or made. Have a competition to vote for the best, hang them on the office tree or display through the office. Bonus points for those made from recycled materials!
  2. Thanks giving. Donate £12 and Child.org will deliver a Christmas version of a Thank you Treat to the desk of someone who has been a really great colleague this year. (Email ami@child.org if you're interested in setting this one up.)
  3. Charity Shop Dash. Donate £10 to take part, then get £5 budget back to buy a ridiculous jumper or other clothing item from the local charity shop for the person you pull out of the hat. Give prizes to those who buy the best items. If there are charity shops near you, you can all go at lunchtime at the same time to make this more fun. Then you can donate it all back to the shop afterwards.
  4. Treasure hunt around the office. Someone comes in early and hides Christmas chocolates everywhere. Prize for the person who finds the most. 
  5. Mad hatters. Competition for best Christmas hat made out of old office magazines/leaflets/scrap paper.
  6. Bargain hunt challenge. Everyone spends £5 in a charity shop, and is challenged to sell what they buy on ebay for a profit (donated to charity). Prize for the person who sells their item for the most.
  7. Christmas child gallery. Everyone (or just your senior team) brings in a photo of themselves as a child at Christmas time. Run a sweepstake where people donate £2 to guess who is who.
  8. Swap shop sweep. Everyone brings in something nice that they don’t need any more - could be books, clothing or unwanted gifts from last year! People pay a donation to enter the sweep and take something they like. 
  9. Christmas joke contest. Donate to enter your Christmas joke and a panel will choose the winner and award a trophy/prize. 

Got other ideas? Tweet us @childdotorg and if we like them, we'll add them to this list.

If you're doing some festive fundraising at your workplace for Child.org we will record you a personal festive thank you video. Email hello@child.org to tell us about your plans and request your video.

 

Cute festive dog photo is by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

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